‘Locke & Key’ Navigates A Logistical Nightmare

Sometimes writing can merely feel like logistical management. There are often so many characters, settings, and objects that they all need to be kept track of and marked as to where they are and what they are doing at any given point in time. This becomes easier if the scope is relatively small. Fewer players and things involved means a writer has less to track. Of course, the bigger a story is, and the more elements that are involved, can blow up the story to epic proportions. But it can also work against the writer and the audience if they have to remember too many moving parts. And no recent show creates a bigger problem with this than Locke & Key.

The story revolves around a family that moves into a large mansion where magical keys are hidden around the property. Each key possess a special ability, and the children in the family have to utilize the keys’ powers in order to defeat malevolent forces that want to use them for evil. While the show certainly has a wide assortment of characters, the cast isn’t necessarily the issue. The problem is the keys themselves. In the first season, this wasn’t as big of a deal. The characters were learning about the keys gradually and so the audience had time to catch up and keep track of what all the keys did and where they were.

As the story and seasons progressed, however, and the show introduced new and interesting keys in order to have its characters use new abilities, they became more difficult keep to track. This show’s creative team certainly had a whiteboard to mark down where they keys were, their status, and who had possession of them. But for the audience — which is certainly not keeping score of all of the keys —  it can become a logistical nightmare to recall where everything was at all times. And there is certainly the possibility that the writers could make a mistake and forget about a certain key or even mark it in the wrong place. Fortunately, the show never made had that happen. But it’s still a lesson that the more elements a story has the harder it is to manage logistics.

Locke & Key is now streaming on Netflix

Sometimes writing can merely feel like logistical management. There are often so many characters, settings, and objects that they allCOMICONRead More

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