Where was Premiere Pro Used In Creating TV shows?

A Powerful Tool

The usage of video is one of the most important aspect of modern content creation these days, as the dominant form of communication of ideas, entertainment and even sending institutional messages across companies all over the world. This new era of video communication is mainly driven by the fact that access to filming video, but also to the tools needed to edit those “clips” into a more meaningful form, allowing hundreds of thousands to expose their ideas on the Internet, especially since the surge of streaming services and video platforms like YouTube.

In fact, the use of video editing tools like Adobe Premiere isn´t something new, the first edition of this software was launched for Mac almost 31 years ago, back in December of 1991, as a very precarious video editing software, as many other programs were back then. It evolved into something new for the era, the concept of Non Linear Editing emerged by the hand of Premiere, and it was the idea that one could work in a timeline, conserving the original footage as a clip, being able to modify it, but not forced to imprint one over the other as it was done in the cinema and video industry in the past…

Little after 10 years after the original release of Premiere, its successor, a newly written and more capable editor came to light, the Pro version of the program. Being advertised as the most powerful video editor of 2003, it surely proved to be a very capable tool, especially for the video formats used back then. Keep in mind that back then, the maximum resolution went as far as 1024 by 768 in 4:3 monitors in PCs, but maybe a little more in widescreen TVs, but not further than a much stretched 1280 by 720.

The era of digital video

By 2010 the availability of LCDs made the average resolution about 1080p, also known as 1920 by 1080, and it started the era of High Quality video, or High Definition also known as HD. This represented a new challenge for video editors, such as Adobe Premiere Pro, but the constant updates allowed this software to move along the new technologies, sometimes even surpassing them as Adobe was always looking to what was about to be launched in the video market and reacted to it before it even happened.

So by the time HD video came to the world, there was a software capable of editing video and creating whole films, and back then some famous producers started noticing that this kind of editing could be very important for the cinema industry, as it cut costs, allowed for a more interactive and collaborative work, and of course, made the adding of effects much easier. Particularly because of the cooperative spirit that most Adobe products have, allowing some backgrounds from Photoshop as well as effects from After Effects to be pasted in the same clip, without much problems.

Most recently, in the past 10 years there´s been quite a boom in terms of the usage of this software to create TV shows, as well as movies. There are a big number of huge Hollywood projects that have been filmed even in 6K like David Fincher´s “Gone Girl”, edited in Adobe Premiere Pro, with the particularity that some of the footage was filmed in that resolution, and needed a software capable of handling such big files. Fortunately for those in charge of post-production, this program was able to manage such huge video files quite easily, helping improve times with a great video finish.

TV shows with Adobe Premiere Pro

In fact there are many of Netflix productions that rely completely in Premiere Pro, like the TV Show Mindhunter, one of the best pieces of production in their catalogue, that deeply used the After Effects tool, and was easily linked with Premiere Pro via the Dynamic Link tool, helping to cut times greatly in a sometimes delayed production. One of the editors in charge of this show admitted “As editors…we are like investigators obsessing over footage to bring out the best in every detail to make each shot as enriched as possible”, and Premiere Pro was the tool that facilitated their obsession.

Even the huge production and one of the most expensive films in movies history, 2009´s Avatar was edited with Adobe Premiere Pro, with the great challenge of being able to move files from Avid back to Premiere Pro, without missing metadata, deeply improving the quality of the work of the editors. These tools also allowed James Cameron to be able to watch the results of a scene almost in real time, as After Effects and Premiere allowed him to add effects to those scenes just filmed, greatly boosting the morale of the set.

There´s also the example of the renowned documentary, called “Minding the Gap” in which the three-man production team chose Premiere Pro since they were working with different video formats, and the only way to bring them all together was via this software, that really made their lives much easier, avoiding them some of the great barriers that the usage of different kind of videos use to uphold in the past.

The post Where was Premiere Pro Used In Creating TV shows? appeared first on TRIPWIRE MAGAZINE.

A Powerful Tool The usage of video is one of the most important aspect of modern content creation these days, as the dominant form of communication of ideas, entertainment and even sending institutional messages across companies all over the world. This new era of video communication is mainly driven by the fact that access to
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