Vienna Blood’s Director Robert Dornhelm Talks About Its Third Season

Finding Something New To Say

Vienna Blood‘s third season will air on BBC Two in December and here’s its director Robert Dornhelm talking about it…

Were there changes you wanted to make to the show for Season Three?

Having directed on Seasons 1 and 2 my biggest credo was not to repeat myself. You cannot do the same thing over again. Yes, the two principal characters and their families stayed the same, but I wanted to find new aspects. There are always new stories, new themes. So, I don’t feel yet that I’m repeating myself.

How does the casting process work?

We’re lucky that we’re dealing only with an English and German speaking collaboration. I’ve done one show where we had eight countries, and every country had a wish and every country had an accent. Here we’re taking the people that are most convincing for the part.

Can you tell us about the three new films?

All three films are so totally different. One is set in the world of high fashion and questions the friendship of our two main characters because Oscar starts to be very suspicious of his friend’s interest in the murder case. The second film is about guilt and paying the price for having behaved morally unacceptably once in life. That ghost will never leave you. And the third one is about politics, accusation, manipulation and blame. It is a very interesting situation, because nationalism is something we all hate, or I do at least. Our suspect is a nationalist but is very sympathetic and turns out to be friendly towards our protagonists. He’s so friendly, good looking and a smooth operator that you forgive him. The banality of evil.

What does the Liebermann family bring to the series?

I like to spend my evenings with the Lieberman family because they represent a very wholesome society and you can identify with them. They are the mensch part of our story and they bring humour and entertainment, humanity and wit.

How do you work with music?

For the last 25 years I’ve never delivered a finished film and put temp music on it and then asked a composer to replace it. That to me is very counter-productive. I like to listen to the music before I start the project. I sit with the composer, Roman Kariolou in this case, and the piano and we talk about the genre. I like to have at least three or four pieces of music before I start shooting. To have them in my ear.

During the shoot my composer works parallel to me. He gets the dailies, I talk to him and he delivers, rough thematic pieces and we cut to his music often to his surprise, because my editor, Klaus Hundsbichler is also a composer and a musician himself. So, we’re in good hands in that department. I always need music before I start shooting. It is absolutely essential for me. We whistle along as we cut and play.

How do you make Vienna Blood stand out as a crime series?

I’m trying to bring in the cultural situation in which our stories take place, the politics and the art of the day and the interrelation between the characters. Because without that, I think it would be just another police drama.

Tonally we are constantly switching between light entertainment and drama. So, making these films is a kind of tightrope act. It’s a journey on eggshells. You must be careful. If you lose the drama of the whodunnit and remain only humorous, then people won’t find the suspense or care who’s the murderer. At the same time, if you are too serious, then you lose the humanity and the entertainment. And so, we have to keep both genres connected. That’s the dance between the naturalistic or realistic police drama and the more poetic or lyrical side of the story. And that’s what interests me.

Does early 20th Century history speak to you?

This story takes place in a very interesting part of European history. I think we’re in a very interesting period right now, to top it all we were shooting 200 kilometres away from a disgusting war, senseless like most wars are senseless. Our story takes place before the eruption of the First World War with the collapse of the Austro-Hungarian monarchy and a rise of fanatic nationalism. But at the same time a beautiful new era developed in the arts which freed itself from the classical form of music and paintings. To set your story in that period is very fertile for the imagination.

For me, doing these journeys into the past, if you don’t have any realisation of the present, is pointless. Yes, there are nice costumes and everything. But you must understand why you are telling the story in 1908 and recognise what’s happening today – the intolerant side of it.

The post Vienna Blood’s Director Robert Dornhelm Talks About Its Third Season appeared first on TRIPWIRE MAGAZINE.

Finding Something New To Say Vienna Blood‘s third season will air on BBC Two in December and here’s its director Robert Dornhelm talking about it… Were there changes you wanted to make to the show for Season Three? Having directed on Seasons 1 and 2 my biggest credo was not to repeat myself. You cannot
The post Vienna Blood’s Director Robert Dornhelm Talks About Its Third Season appeared first on TRIPWIRE MAGAZINE.Read MoreTRIPWIRE MAGAZINE

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